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Building laws to stop child burns

    News
  • Wednesday, January 14, 2004
Child safety organisations have endorsed Government proposals to reduce the number of injuries from scalding water. The Government said last week that, following campaigning by the Child Accident Prevention Trust (CAPT), it was proposing bringing water temperature safety within the scope of building regulations in England and Wales. This would ensure that thermostatic mixing valves were fixed to bath taps to control the temperature of water coming out of showers and hot taps to baths and basins in all new or converted private housing by 2006.

Curiouser & curiouser

    News
  • Wednesday, January 7, 2004
Children's innate and all-important sense of curiosity about the world around them can be fostered by adults who provide them with questions and learning opportunities Curiosity, or an eager desire to know, is the key to the joy of learning.

Shabby treatment

    News
  • Wednesday, January 7, 2004
New Labour has piloted some innovative childcare programmes but, argues Julian Grenier, its business model for delivering public services is not going to work Gordon Brown's promise to fund 1,000 Children's Centres has to be the most exciting policy for the early years announced by any Government. But do you ever get the feeling that for all the money the Government has put into the early years, things haven't got much better?

Community members joining health visitors

    News
  • Wednesday, January 7, 2004
A health project in Glasgow has recruited lay support workers from the community to work alongside health visitors to help give vulnerable children from deprived areas a better start in life. The groundbreaking work of the Starting Well Health Demonstration Project is currently being discussed at the British Psychological Society's Division of Educational and Child Psychology conference in Paris. The 3m project, which offers intensive support for families in the home and gives them access to facilities in the community, has already helped 1,800 families in two of the Scottish city's poorest areas. It is now entering its second phase after being funded initially for three years when it was established in 2000.

Childhaven Community Nursery School in Scarborough

    News
  • Wednesday, January 7, 2004
Childhaven Community Nursery School in Scarborough has become the first local authority-maintained nursery school in England to be given a nationally accredited quality assurance award. Betsy Hill, chair of the North Yorkshire Early Years Development and Childcare Partnership, awarded the North Yorkshire kitemark to headteacher Kate Tate. A plaque was also unveiled and each member of staff and each child received a kitemark badge. Christine Goldsack, national co-ordinator of the kitemark quality assurance scheme, said, 'North Yorkshire and Scarborough in particular should be delighted that children and their families are benefiting from the very high quality at Childhaven. It has been delightful to see children so happy, busy and enthusiastic to learn.' All settings providing care and education for children under six are being encouraged to strive for a quality assurance award.

Network criteria

    News
  • Wednesday, January 7, 2004
The comment in the news story 'Networks "a success story"' (20 November) about childminding networks in England needing to be approved by the National Childminding Association is misleading. For this financial year, in order for local authorities to qualify for the 25,000 grant, the network does not necessarily have to be approved under the NCMA's quality assurance scheme, but rather, as the report states, 'be approved by the NCMA's quality standards as Children Come First networks or meet broadly similar criteria'. It is not mandatory for the network to be NCMA-approved.

Fur play

    News
  • Tuesday, January 6, 2004
Harry Harrington is a special teddy bear. His owner Chrissie Clark has developed a huge personality for this furry friend who helps improve standards in the classroom

Tighter police checks urged

    News
  • Wednesday, December 31, 2003
Organisations representing the early years sector and school staff across the UK have called for the Government to tighten up its system of checks on all people working or applying to work with children. The calls followed the two life sentences given to school caretaker Ian Huntley for murdering ten-year-old Holly Wells and Jessica Chapman at his home in Soham in August 2002.

The Skills Active Playwork Unit

    News
  • Wednesday, October 8, 2003
The Skills Active Playwork Unit is holding a series of 12 one-day regional events across the UK from mid-October to mid- November as part of the consultation process for developing the National Occupational Standards for Level 4 in playwork and for reviewing the Level 3 qualification. The morning sessions will concentrate on playwork qualifications, followed by joint discussions in the afternnon with early years professionals on areas in common and differences between developing National Occupational Standards in playwork and those in early years. For full details of dates and venues visit the website www.playwork.org.uk/nos.

Out of the blue

    News
  • Wednesday, October 8, 2003
The sky's the limit for thinking and learning when you lead the children in exploring one of the most overlooked aspects of our environment, says Helen Shelbourne Adult-led activity

A private matter

    News
  • Wednesday, October 8, 2003
By Suzi Beaman, owner of Holding the Reins Nursery in Plymouth, Devon We have run our nursery and cared for children aged two to five for 12 years. Following our recent transitional Ofsted inspection, we were told we needed to respect the children's privacy. Apparently we didn't, in our practice of changing children's clothes or nappies because, taking a child and staff protection perspective, they are changed in view of another member of staff, and after outdoor water play we change the children in front of each other.

David Miliband

    News
  • Wednesday, October 1, 2003
Taking children out on educational visits was defended by school standards minister David Miliband last week, after Paul Ellis, a geography teacher at Fleetwood High School in Lancashire, was jailed for eight months for manslaughter following the drowning of a ten-year-old schoolboy in his care on a school trip. Mr Miliband said, 'Teachers should not abandon school visits. Safely conducted and properly supervised, they are an important part of any child's education.' He said the Government was committed to supporting 'the professional competence of teachers who supervise educational visits, many of whom do so in their own spare time'. David Hart, general secretary of the National Association of Head Teachers, also said that this case should not deter teachers from leading such trips. Guidance on health and safety on school trips has been issued by the Department for Education and Skills on www.teachernet.gov.uk/healthandsafety.

MMR jab

    News
  • Wednesday, October 1, 2003
Immunisations with the combined measles, mumps and rubella vaccine in England fell by two percentage points to 82 per cent in 2002-03 from 84 per cent in 2001-02, according to official statistics published last week. Just under one in five two-year-olds in England were not immunised. But Melanie Johnson, public health minister, hailed as 'encouraging' more recent statistics from the Health Protection Agency that showed a 6.6 per cent rise between March and August 2003 in the uptake of MMRamong 16-month-old children. She said this 'suggests that we are seeing a renewed confidence among parents and carers that MMR is the best way to protect children'. Other figures showed that in 2002-03, 94 per cent of children in England were immunised against diphtheria and tetanus - the same level as in 2001-02, but lower than the peak of 96 per cent in 1996-97.

Waste not . . .

    News
  • Wednesday, October 1, 2003
Existing nurseries can also adopt environmental approaches to make their setting more green: Save energy (and cut your fuel bills)

Foundation post delights sector

    News
  • Tuesday, September 23, 2003
Early years organisations in England have given a warm welcome to the appointment of Lesley Staggs as the Government's first-ever national director of the Foundation Stage.

All systems go

    News
  • Wednesday, September 17, 2003
A topic on transport offers many varied opportunities to develop children's ICT skills in a fun and meaningful way Role play

Quote of the week

    News
  • Wednesday, September 17, 2003
'It is a bitter irony that the rising level of women's employment in the UK is being underpinned, in many instances, by the low-paid work of other women cleaning their homes and looking after their children. ' Natasha Walter, The Guardian

At the wheel

    News
  • Wednesday, September 17, 2003
A round-up of books, toys and other travel resources to help you get the most out of the topic Wheeled toys

Precious moments

    News
  • Tuesday, September 16, 2003
Children with terminal medical conditions are being given the chance to live life to the full. Judith Napier visits an inspiring hospice

Editor's view

    News
  • Wednesday, September 10, 2003
The Foundation Stage Profile system of assessment starts its second year this term in reception classes across England. By and large its introduction has been welcomed by practitioners. Those who have struggled with it, however, are those who do not have observation and assessment at the heart of their practice. Our new series on planning for the Foundation Stage, which starts this week, will highlight the importance of good observation and assessment, particularly for short-term planning (see 'Story lines', pages 12-13).

Stephen Burke

    News
  • Wednesday, September 10, 2003
Stephen Burke, director of the Daycare Trust, was presented with the Work-Life Balance Initiative Award by Cherie Booth in London last week at the start of Work-Life Balance Week, run by the Work-Life Balance Trust. Mr Burke said, 'Childcare is a key part of work-life balance. It needs to be quality childcare, childcare that enables children to start life safe and happy and to grow up safe and happy.' The Daycare Trust was recognised for its campaigning for children's centres, for more help for parents to pay for childcare and promoting the role of men in childcare.

Mixed fortunes

    News
  • Wednesday, September 10, 2003
While some out-of-school clubs have never needed to raise funds, others are struggling to survive. Simon Vevers looks at why funding arrangements mean some clubs face closure and how this will affect future expansion There were a few hundred after-school clubs in the late 1980s but dramatic expansion has resulted in the numbers topping 10,000 and continuing to climb. A target of 20,000 clubs by 2010 is reachable, given the necessary political will and finance, according to a report from the Kids' Club Network (KCN) and HSBC Bank.

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