Play organisations awarded 900,000 to support local projects

Be the first to comment

The Free Time Consortium, a collective of local voluntary play organisations, has been awarded a grant of 900,000 to support local play projects.

ef839d97a6be36bc9f21abf48c85683e

The funding is from the Cabinet Office’s Social Action Fund, which offers grants to projects across England that expand volunteering and the giving of time, money, knowledge and assets.

The consortium has received the grant in recognition of its success last year when it helped 47,000 people to volunteer their time, expertise and enthusiasm to encourage more children to play outside.

According to the Free Time Consortium - whose members include national charities such as Play England, the National Children’s Bureau and local play associations - thousands of people have come forward to offer their time and unique skills to children and those who work with them.

Catherine Prisk, director of Play England, said, ‘We’re overjoyed that the Free Time Consortium has been awarded this new funding. Supporting children’s play has provided a focus for community action. It has been a real catalyst for everyone to get involved - children, parents and grandparents. Not only will these projects give many thousands of adults the satisfaction of helping out in their local community, ultimately it means that more children across the country will get a chance to get out and play.’

The minister for Civil Society Nick Hurd said, ‘This investment is in recognition of the huge numbers of diverse volunteers the project has brought together, and of the tangible impact it has had for so many children. A strong county is built on solid communities which is why we are continuing to support this nationwide play project in creating opportunities for volunteers to get involved and share their skills with children and young people.'

Play England, a member of the Free Time Consortium, is calling on people to show they ‘love outdoor play’ and help make sure children can play outside more often.

blog comments powered by Disqus