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Communication, language and music are intrinsically linked, and it is important to understand this in the early years, writes Linda Pound

Activities that use computational thinking, such as giving a robot very simple instructions, teach problem-solving and encourages children to take a creative approach to technology. By Marc Faulder

Early years practitioners need to see learning – particularly in mathematics – not as abstract and ‘disembodied’ but as inherently concrete and ‘embodied’. Dr Jennifer S Thom explains why

Foundation Stage Units are in the spotlight amid Government plans to greater align EYFS and Key Stage 1 goals. Anne O’Connor outlines how they work and examines their benefits and challenges

How experimenting with music aids children’s personal, social and emotional development and promotes self-regulation. Linda Pound explains, and offers practical advice for practitioners

A defunct alphabet that was used in schools in the 1960s and 70s provides important lessons for current approaches to the literacy teaching of young children, discovers Caroline Vollans

Action research might sound like the last thing that time-pressed practitioners will want to do, but it is a really useful tool to demonstrate the improving quality of your practice, finds Dr Kay Mathieson

Computational thinking can take place in the kitchen, when sequencing stories, in experimenting with floating and sinking objects, and even when playing with toy cars, explains Marc Faulder

Physical development and music go hand in hand, and the key to success is variety, explains Linda Pound in the second part of this series

How does the ability to form and retrieve memories develop in children, why is it important to early learning, and how can adults help to stimulate it? Anne O’Connor reports