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Found 38,150 results for .

Search Results

Found 38,150 results for .

'Help schools to combat bullying'

    News
  • Wednesday, November 14, 2001
Bullying in schools could be curbed by Government measures, says ChildLine. The charity put forward recommendations for the Government to help prevent bullying in schools at its conference in London last week, chaired by Cherie Booth QC (pictured, right, with ChildLine chair Esther Rantzen OBE).

Professional training doesn't come free

    News
  • Wednesday, November 14, 2001
As a tutor on childcare, child development and play courses, I have been very interested in the articles and letters in Nursery World recently concerning the confusion about qualification levels for assistants and supervisors in various settings. As I work mainly in the 'community-based' sector I think your readers need to be aware that people who are already working for next to nothing also have to undertake training at their own expense. It is all very well for Richard Dorrrance, chief executive of CACHE, to say, 'If early years workers want to be called - and paid as - professionals, they must keep their training up to date.' Where do people who earn the basic minimum wage of 4.10 per hour find over 200 to register on a level 2 course?

Make ICT work

    News
  • Wednesday, November 7, 2001
With careful planning, ICT can be productive and fun, as a school in Manchester discovered, says Jenny Benjamin It often seems that ICT provision in schools and nurseries is all about buying hardware. Make enough money on your fete or save enough cereal packets and your nursery's computer needs will be met.

Who cares?

    News
  • Wednesday, November 7, 2001
On the eve of Government moves to increase the number of children who find permanent adoptive families, psychologist Hessel Willemsen describes the trauma facing those forced to live in temporary care settings There has been concern for some time about the plight of children in local authority care. Separated from their families because of neglect or emotional, physical or sexual abuse, only a tiny few have been lucky enough to find the security of an adopted family. The rest - and there are nearly 60,000 children in the care of local authorities at any one time in England, with more than 10,000 under four years old - are placed in temporary foster homes or residential homes and schools.

A healthy choice

    News
  • Wednesday, November 7, 2001
After watching two videos on vaccination, one for and one against, at college, my whole opinion on vaccination changed. I would not have had my four children vaccinated at all. A natural decline was already occurring in these illnesses before the vaccination programme. It is important for a child to build up its own natural immunity, but I also believe now that vaccination does more harm than good to a baby's immune system (not to mention the addition of mercury and formaldehyde to these vaccinations).

Pooled funding benefits families

    News
  • Wednesday, November 7, 2001
A new 1.2m purpose-built centre in Ruchazie, Glasgow, is providing a wealth of services for families and young children, including a project to help men to be better dads. The charity Quarriers, which provides family support services to people who have chronic drug or alcohol problems or who have suffered neglect or abuse, moved its Glasgow family support unit from temporary premises into the new centre last month. A funding package for the Quarriers Family Resource Project was devised last year following negotiations between the charity, Greater Glasgow Health Board, Glasgow Council education and social work departments, two of Glasgow's social inclusion partnerships and Scottish Homes. Their efforts were praised last week in a report on integrated children's services, which cited the project as an example of what can be achieved by pooling budgets.

Quote of the week

    News
  • Wednesday, April 24, 2002
'To deal with a particular grievance of parents who work irregular hours or have disabled children, I have decided that support for childcare costs should include help with approved childcare in your own home.' Chancellor of the exchequer Gordon Brown

Asylum education plans under attack

    News
  • Wednesday, April 24, 2002
Children of asylum seekers will be denied the right to mainstream education by the Nationality, Immigration and Asylum Bill, charities working with refugees have claimed. Under the Bill introduced earlier this month, children housed in the proposed new accommodation centres for asylum seekers will be unable to attend a school or receive a pre-school education unless they have special needs. Instead they will receive education on site, along with their healthcare.

A bilingual compact disc

    News
  • Wednesday, April 24, 2002
A bilingual compact disc has been produced by the Welsh Dyslexia Project to give parents a multi-sensory way of understanding their child's difficulties and what they can do to help. The English-Welsh CD has been designed to complement a bilingual booklet, Guide for Parents, which was produced in collaboration with Wales Digital College. Jane Davidson, minister for education and lifelong learning, praised the work of the Project, which has also received funding from the Welsh Assembly to produce a dyslexic diagnostic test for Welsh-speaking children with special educational needs. She said, 'The commitment, research and hard work of organisations such as the Welsh Dyslexia Project are extremely valuable. The CD reflects moves to include and support parents of children with special educational needs.' For more information, contact the Project on 01239 682849.

Radio appeals to children's senses

    News
  • Wednesday, April 24, 2002
Anew radio project wants to encourage young children to 'see' with their ears. The 'Let's Make Radio' project promotes radio as an essential tool in the development of listening and speaking skills in early years children. The scheme, developed in partnership with Abracadabra!, the children's radio service, encourages childcarers and teachers to embrace the opportunities radio can bring.

Ask the expert

    News
  • Wednesday, April 24, 2002
Child psychologist Jennie Lindon answers your letters about child behaviour. Q. We have two children (both four-year-olds) currently in our nursery who each have an imaginary friend. One child just uses her friend in her pretend play: chatting and involving the friend in domestic role play in the home corner. We realise that many young children have an imaginary friend, so we do not see this automatically as a problem. However, the second child really seems to need his 'friend' to speak up for him. His father is getting worried that his son can't tell the difference between fantasy and reality.

Look out for the ratio of fees to wages

    News
  • Wednesday, April 24, 2002
In the 28 March edition of Nursery World, there were two items that particularly interested me - the news story 'Nursery profits "are hyped to investors"' concerning the Children's Nurseries - UK Market Sector Report by Laing and Buisson, and the letter 'Between a rock and a hard place' by Kirsty Lester, who owns a day nursery. If, as according to the Laing and Buisson report, the average fee for a full-time nursery place is 120 a week and the average hourly rate of nursery nurses is 5.45, then day nurseries like ourselves which charge just 80 per week (because that is all the local economy can stand) should be paying staff an average of Pounds 3.63 per hour on a pro-rata basis. National Minimum Wage requirements, however, are considerably higher, and the lowest wage paid in this nursery is Pounds 4.40 per hour.

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