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Seeing a young boy do something considered feminine provokes some extended thinking about traditional gender roles and stereotypes. Anne O'Connor explores the issues in practice.

Children's physical responses to the frustration and anger they may feel are often misunderstood, and labelling them is counter-productive, says Karen Faux.

It's a common occurrence, so why does a child's biting cause so much upset? Annette Rawstrone spoke to practitioners at a private day nursery. Illustration by Clare Nichols.

Young children may tell untruths because they want them to be true, and adults can help by modelling desirable behaviour, says Annette Rawstrone.

The experiences young children have with their carers can shape the development of their brains and influence the sort of people they become, says Maria Robinson.

Practitioners should be alert to children in their care who may lack the sense of secure attachment they need for emotional development, and offer their families whatever support they can, says Anne O'Connor.

To an infant, moving into group care from the familiar relationships of home can be like arriving in a foreign country. But a practitioner's thoughtful, personal interactions can bridge the gap, says Rod Parker-Rees

Practitioners in early years settings may be the first to notice if a child shows what could be the signs of depression. Annette Rawstrone finds out what to do.

A child's ability to grow emotionally, make relationships with others and learn effectively can depend on the sense of safety and confidence they derive from having a secure attachment in infancy, says Anne O'Connor

Practitioners with twins in their settings need to be aware of particular issues within their learning and social development. Ruth Thomson discovers why.

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