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It is crucial that practitioners understand the sensory, social and emotional factors that could impede a child's development - and how to plan for individual needs. Sue Chambers explains

There are three different levels of confidence, and practitioners have an important role to play in helping these to flourish in children, argue John Hattie and Gregory CR Yates in this edited extract from their new book on the science of learning.

A family of toy mice has been introduced to one London school to support emotional well-being and confidence. Laura Semmens shares her experience.

Observing children's schemas is not only a useful way to shape play - there is evidence that these patterns of behaviour offer guidance to individuals' emotions. Kath Tayler looks at a case study.

Ensuring that babies mature in a positive manner is an important but challenging task, says Bernadette Duffy

One nursery is replicating the primary school lunch experience to help children adjust more easily to the change. Nicole Weinstein explains.

Settling in and building relationships are key challenges for settings involved in the two-year-old programme, and nurseries can find ways to smooth the process, says Penny Tassoni.

Enabling children to experience joy can help support learning and reduce stress and anxiety.Linda Pound offers some insight into the steps practitioners can take to embrace this approachPhotographs at Lincolnshire Montessori, Guzelian; Clovercourt, Justin Thomas; and Mains Farm, North News.

Children will sometimes take things that do not belong to them, but this isn't necessarily stealing. Sue Chambers explains why.

A lack of consideration for others is seen as the root of many social problems - hence the key role of the early years in developing empathy in children.

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