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Search Results

Found 38,165 results for .

Mind that child

    News
  • Wednesday, February 27, 2002
Nannies who have made the transition to childminding tell Helen Kewley about the comforts of work from home As the roads become more choked with traffic and nannies find that travel to work can add tediously to an already long working day, it's no wonder that I'm getting phone calls asking for information about how to register as a childminder. It is the nanny's way of 'working from home'.

A parent's guide to early literacy

    News
  • Wednesday, February 20, 2002
Cut out and photocopy Some parents believe that putting a child on a reading scheme as soon as possible will mean that they will do better at school later on - but this is not the case. In fact, pushing a child into formal reading and writing exercises too young can damage the development of literacy. A far more effective way of equipping your child with good literacy skills is by having fun! Some ideas for fun are suggested here.

No rubber stamp

    News
  • Wednesday, February 20, 2002
As an Ofsted childcare inspector I am interested in the question of registering nannies, as it would be my colleagues and myself who would have to do the job (News, 17 January). Your cartoon (Letters, 31 January) shows an official simply rubber-stamping documents. I imagine that the actual process would be more complex.

TV and radio

    News
  • Wednesday, February 20, 2002
'Archive Hour - The Killing Fields' (BBC Radio 4, 8.02 to 9pm)

Unison's priorities set for early years

    News
  • Wednesday, February 20, 2002
Public services union Unison has set out two key goals for the early years in its education manifesto, launched at a parliamentary reception in Westminster last week. The manifesto, which includes Unison's policy priorities for all education staff from early years to university, calls for recognition that nursery education is key to providing equal opportunities for all children and tackling social exclusion, and for access to high-quality, affordable childcare for all children that is provided by properly trained and fairly paid staff.

The work of a successful child development programme in Scotland

    News
  • Wednesday, February 13, 2002
(Photograph) - The work of a successful child development programme in Scotland looks set to continue thanks to a Pounds 70,000 cash injection. The Play@home activity scheme, originally set up in 1999 by Fife Council and Fife Primary Care NHS Trust, will receive 35,000 from both the council's Children's Services Committee and the NHS Fife Board. The three-step activity programme offers parents fun ways to interact with their children and stimulate co-ordination and activity from birth to nursery age. Fife's chair of children's services, councillor Helen Law said, 'Play@home is a wonderful example of what can be achieved when agencies combine their skills to provide joined-up services tailored to meeting the needs of children.'

Neighbourhood grants awarded

    News
  • Wednesday, February 13, 2002
The first New Opportunities Fund (NOF) grants towards neighbourhood nurseries were awarded last week. The Fund's Building Neighbourhood Nurseries programme has awarded grants totalling 154,094 in Herefordshire, Newcastle and Bolton to renovate and construct new neighbourhood nurseries.

Action points: managing staff personal problems

    News
  • Wednesday, February 13, 2002
* Never ignore the problem and allow it to develop until it impacts on the other staff, children and parents. * If there are enough staff available, take the person outside for a chat. If not, say, "Take ten minutes out to settle yourself and we will talk later".'

Shop 'til you drop

    News
  • Wednesday, February 13, 2002
Part of the early learning goal for Knowledge and Understanding of the World is to 'find out about and identify the uses of everyday technology'. A good way of doing this is to provide ICT opportunities in role play areas, for example a shop. Try some of the following ideas:

Understaffed

    News
  • Wednesday, February 13, 2002
Why are childminders allowed sole charge of up to six children? A day nursery would have to provide two members of staff to care for one child, let alone six. Childminders should have to employ an assistant when caring for other people's children. This would provide a safety net for the children if the childminder should become ill or was in an unfit state to care for the children in her home.

Donna Agnew, age 21, of Kilrea, Co Londonderry

    News
  • Wednesday, February 6, 2002
(Photograph) - Donna Agnew, age 21, of Kilrea, Co Londonderry, is this year's winner of the Causeway Institute of Further and Higher Education's Early Years Cup, sponsored by Nursery World. Donna, a BTec National Diploma student in childhood studies at the Institute's Ballymoney campus, achieved distinctions in all units and works as a classroom assistant in Kilrea Primary School. She celebrated with course tutor Norma McKinney (centre) and Aine Lynch, course co-ordinator and head of health, social care and catering.

Reception staff in redundancy fight

    News
  • Wednesday, February 6, 2002
Nursery nurses working in reception classes have mounted a campaign to fight their local authority's plans to make them redundant. A consultation paper sent to headteachers in the London borough of Hounslow in the last week of January put forward proposals to cut the budget for reception units by 990,000 and fund reception at the same rate as year one. In practice this would require the withdrawal of nursery nurses from early years teams and affect 97 nursery nurse jobs. The consultation period ends on 15 February.

The number of three-and four-year-olds in Britain's schools has trebled

    News
  • Wednesday, February 6, 2002
The number of three-and four-year-olds in Britain's schools has trebled over the past 30 years, Government statistics show. The 32nd edition of Social Trends, published last week by the Office for National Statistics, said that as a result of the rise in pre-school-age children enrolled in schools, the total number of playgroups and pre-schools in 2001 fell to 14,000, which was 300 fewer than in 2000. The number of places also fell by 23,000 - a six per cent drop - to 330,000 in 2001. But there are now 12 times the number of out-of-school club places for children aged five to seven in England than there were a decade ago. In 2001, 4,900 out-of-school clubs provided 152,800 places for five-to seven-year-olds, compared with 350 clubs in 1992. Among other areas profiled in Social Trends, the report noted 'a highly-significant increasing trend' in the proportion of nought- to four-year-olds who are overweight. But children's dental health has improved in recent years. In 1999/2000, 60 per cent of five-year-olds had no decayed, missing or filled teeth compared with 56 per cent in 1989. The report also noted that the number of families with dependent children headed by a lone parent is three times higher than it was in 1971.

A can of worms

    News
  • Wednesday, February 6, 2002
The Government may not have guessed what a complicated set of issues it was opening up when it said it wanted to enhance the role of teaching assistants, says Dr Alan Marr The Government is pushing ahead with its plans to develop an enhanced role for classroom assistants. After ministers insisting for months that the rise in numbers of teaching assistants (TAs) was unrelated to teacher shortages and denying that they were a cheap option to paper over recruitment difficulties, recent statements have suggested that the Government does now view TA employment as going some way to alleviating the problem.

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