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Search Results

Found 38,150 results for .

Listening to families

    News
  • Wednesday, August 10, 2005
Readers may be interested in the 'Listen' event organised by Tower Hamlets Early Years Service, which is encouraging nurseries in the borough to set up workshops for parents on communicating with their children through play. The George Green Children's Centre used the theme of favourite toys.

Trade places on TV

    News
  • Wednesday, August 10, 2005
The BBC programme 'Who Rules the Roost?' is looking for working families and single parents to feature in the next series. The programme gives working mothers and fathers the opportunity to take on the role of stay-at-home parent for two weeks. For many working parents the obligations and hectic schedules of demanding careers can leave few opportunities to enjoy parenting. Collecting the children from school, a trip to the park, or an hour spent helping with homework can be a rare treat.

Phonics going on trial in 200 schools

    News
  • Wednesday, August 3, 2005
Phonics pilot schemes will run in 200 primary schools linked to early years settings from September, schools minister Andrew Adonis announced last week. The trials will be based on the Primary National Strategy's 'Playing with Sounds' programme, additional guidance on teaching phonics in the Foundation Stage published last year.

Children are consulted at home

    News
  • Wednesday, August 3, 2005
Most families have 'strongly democratic' decision-making processes, with children as young as eight taking part in decisions that affect them, according to new research published by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation. Researchers from the universities of Keele and Cardiff interviewed 117 children between the ages of eight and 11. They found that children were consulted on issues as diverse as meals, discipline and moving house.

Lift the lid

    News
  • Wednesday, July 27, 2005
Pots and pans are too versatile a resource to be confined to the kitchen. Jean Evans shows why

Taking control

    News
  • Wednesday, July 27, 2005
Severe allergy is manageable when practitioners and parents work together, says Anaphylaxis Campaign co-founder David Reading A quarter of a million pre-school children across the UK have nut allergy, according to a House of Commons report published in November 2004. In addition to this, research published in March 2005 showed that families caring for a child with a life-threatening allergy find life even more stressful than those who have been told their child has cancer.

Nannies' day out

    News
  • Wednesday, July 27, 2005
Make sure there's a note in your diary for the Professional Nanny conference in London on Saturday 1 October. The event will feature the awarding of the second Professional Nanny of the Year, for which nominations have just closed, and an open forum session at which you can put your questions to the experts. The day includes a range of workshops on employment issues and good practice working with children, and offers a venue for networking with other nannies from around the country. See the advertisement in this issue for details of how to book.

About this series

    News
  • Wednesday, July 20, 2005
* This series aims to help practitioners inform parents and carers about common concerns and improve practice within their setting. * Display the parent's guide on your noticeboard or give photocopies to parents who ask for advice.

Demands outlined for workforce plans

    News
  • Wednesday, July 20, 2005
Children's services need to be remodelled to provide better outcomes for children, and with that must come a radical reshaping of the workforce, said Paul Ennals, chief executive of the National Children's Bureau, at a conference last week. At 'Reforming the early years workforce', organised by the journal Early Years Update, Mr Ennals outlined the sweeping changes planned for children's services and warned, 'Services are joining up, but we have to get the workforce joined up as well. If we don't get the workforce sorted out, it could all be as nought.'

A month in the life of Harry Tobias

    News
  • Wednesday, July 20, 2005
Physically Harry has achieved a new milestone this month. He can now climb up and down the stairs, but needs careful supervision. He continues to climb on furniture and is very adept at going over the arms of the sofas. Teething has caused Harry to be unsettled during the day and night.

Ask the expert

    News
  • Wednesday, July 20, 2005
Your legal questions answered by Christine Betts, senior lawyer, schools and childcare team, Veale Wasbrough Lawyers Q Many parents at my nursery tell me that their child is 'allergic' or 'sensitive' or 'intolerant' to various foods. Obviously, I don't want to upset children, but are they just being fussy? What would happen if a member of staff accidentally gave a child the 'wrong' food?

On course

    News
  • Wednesday, July 13, 2005
1 - 12 August The Montessori philosophy and apparatus workshop

Music corner

    News
  • Wednesday, July 13, 2005
Music One2One: Music with under two-year-olds The one-to-one project is developing effective ways of working in music with parents and their young children. In the next six Music Corners I will outline activities developed in the project. This week the emphasis is on listening, using carefully selected everyday items - remember one saucepan may have a pleasing sound, another a dull thud - and presenting items in a way that focuses children's listening attention. Crinkling foil

Running out of time

    News
  • Wednesday, July 13, 2005
I read with interest Nursery World's article on the NVQ assessor shortage (News, 2 June). At the time of reading I considered myself, an NVQ assessor, and my co-assessor fortunate to have a college that understood the time that is needed to develop a candidate and help them achieve the NVQ. This meant that we were able to be confident that our candidates would be good practitioners when they went to work in early years settings in our county.

Department for Work and Pensions

    News
  • Wednesday, July 13, 2005
Informal childcare continuesto be relied on more than formal childcare in all family circumstances, says a report from the Department for Work and Pensions based on data from the 2003 Families and Children Study. The report states that formal types of childcare - those eligible for Government support - were used mostly for pre-school children and to a lesser extent young school-age children. Children in Britain: Findings from the 2003 Families and Children Study can be downloaded at www.dwp.gov.uk.

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