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A new guide outlining changes to early years funding and delivery has been published by the Pre-School Learning Alliance.

The Government’s plans to extend the free childcare offer for all three- and four-year-olds in England from 15 to 30 hours a week for children in working families from September 2017 are ‘only likely to increase parental employment slightly’, according to the Institute of Fiscal Studies.

Despite some early years providers and sector organisations remaining concerned following the Department for Education’s publication of the new Early Years National Funding Formula, there are indications that childminders may be feeling more upbeat.

Nurseries across the country are being hit by cuts to funding and increased costs, leading many to close ahead of the introduction of the 30 free hours.

The level of funding for the 30-hour childcare offer will not be subject to an annual review by the Government, the House of Lords has revealed.

Councils will receive a new minimum rate of £4.30 an hour in the new early years funding formula, the early years minister has confirmed.

Nursery school campaigners are calling for sector-wide backing and a government rethink on funding reforms after their online petition tipped the 14,000 mark in just over a fortnight.

The Family and Childcare Trust is calling on the Government to commit new funding to improve early education and childcare.

The British Chambers of Commerce (BCC), which represents 92,000 businesses, wants a universal childcare entitlement up until school entry to help firms retain staff and working parents to progress.

Fewer restrictions are to be placed on the delivery of the 30 free hours of childcare to better meet the needs of children, parents and providers.