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The idea that children are visual, auditory or kinaesthetic learners is ‘completely unhelpful’ for learning, a leading brain expert said at the Nursery World show today.

Clarks has pledged to train all 6,500 of its staff in developing children’s speech, language and communication skills and engaging with families in stores across the country.

Our great seminar programme at the Nursery World Show on 1-2 February includes a look at the vital topic of self-regulation.

Professor Powell moved to the Froebel Trust in September after working at Canterbury Christ Church University in the Research Centre for Children, Families and Communities

Just like adults, children’s personal preoccupations and troubles, no matter how trivial they seem to us, can get the better of them

Sensory experiences are vital to healthy brain development, explain Anne O’Connor and Dr Kath Dickinson in part one of a new series

The quality of adult-child interactions are critical to the well-being and brain development of a baby and young child. When an adult responds to a baby’s babbling, gestures or cries with sensitive eye-contact, words or a hug, this builds and strengthens the neural connections in a baby’s brain. Such interactions are referred to as ‘serve and return’.

Professor Law and Dr Charlton stress the importance of parents reading to their children after their joint study confirmed the positive effect it has on language development.

A new study suggests when preparing children to start school there should be more emphasis on building skills to make and maintain friendships.

Children who are read to regularly by their parents or carers are ahead in their language skills by eight months, suggests a new study.