Opinion remains divided over the merits of snap inspections

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In response to 'When an inspector calls' (Letters, 4 August), while I empathise with the situation of private nurseries, I can assure the writer that inspections in schools are no easier. I was a nursery nurse in a school and the next inspection always loomed.

In response to 'When an inspector calls' (Letters, 4 August), while I empathise with the situation of private nurseries, I can assure the writer that inspections in schools are no easier.

I was a nursery nurse in a school and the next inspection always loomed.

Many of my colleagues and I agreed that we would prefer inspectors to call without warning.

Teachers spent months working on paperwork and I spent numerous hours extra to my normal working week making resources for each area of the two reception classrooms I worked in (as did the other nursery nurses and teachers aides). We also took work home during the holidays and at weekends.

We were under immense pressure and extremely stressed by the time the inspection came and therefore found it hard to 'perform' during the inspection. I feel the children also suffered from this.

Settings should continue as normal and inspections that happen without advance warning will encourage good practice at all times and in all settings, which should lead to an improvement in overall standards.

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