Holiday childcare costs rise by 51 per cent since 2010

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The price of holiday childcare has more than doubled in some areas of the country since 2010, according to an analysis by Labour.

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Holiday childcare costs have more than doubled since 2010

The party compared figures from the Family and Childcare Trust annual holiday childcare survey in 2010 and the 2017 survey, which has just been published.

In 2010, the average weekly cost of holiday childcare in England was £82.40. The average cost is now £124.23, a rise of 51 per cent.

The figures show that the North East of England is the worst affected region in the country, where the average weekly cost of holiday childcare has more than doubled, up from £63.05 in 2010 to £132.98 – a rise of 111 per cent.

In Greater London costs are up by 73 per cent, from £74 a week to £127.87 – an increase of 73 per cent.

In England, the lowest regional rise was in Yorkshire and Humber, where prices were up 21 per cent between 2010 and 2017.

However, costs in Wales were up by 100 per cent since 2010, while the rise in Scotland was the lowest in comparison during the same time period at just 19 per cent.

Office for National Statistics figures show that average weekly earnings are lower in real terms now than they were in May 2010, leaving working families paying a greater proportion of their income to cover the cost of childcare.

Angela Rayner MP, Labour’s shadow education secretary, speaking at a visit to the Wishing Well community project in Crewe, will say, ‘The Tories are quite simply failing working parents, who are seeing the cost of their childcare skyrocket, their wages fall, and their Government failing to give them the support they need.

‘Childcare costs have shot up since the Conservatives took office in 2010, and both wages and Government support have failed to keep pace with either the cost of childcare or the needs of families.’

The Conservative children and families minister Robert Goodwill highlighted that costs in Wales, where Labour are in charge of childcare, have more than doubled.

But appearing on ITV’s Good Morning Britain, Ms Rayner defended Labour’s claims. ‘Labour in Wales have a particular project there in which they also look at helping the most disadvantaged children to ensure that they get subsidised childcare during the holidays,’ she said.

The 16th annual Holiday Childcare Survey by the Family and Childcare Trust, published last week, found that the price of holiday childcare has risen by an average of 4 per cent in Great Britain in the last year, costing parents almost two- and- a-half times per week more than an after school-club during term time.

Megan Jarvie, head of policy and communications, at the Family and Childcare Trust, said, 'Parents are being dealt a double blow this summer: holiday childcare prices have gone up by five percent in England and the availability of holiday childcare has dropped.
 
'With holiday childcare costing parents £748 over the six week holiday – more than twice what families will spend on food and drink in six weeks - we are concerned that many parents will struggle to make work pay or remain in work at all this summer.
 
'Government needs to take urgent action to make sure parents are better off working after they’ve paid for childcare and that there is enough childcare available for every family that needs it.'

A Government spokesperson said, ‘We are investing a record £6 billion per year by 2020 to give families access to high-quality affordable childcare. Parents are already able to access 15 hours of free childcare and from September we are doubling that offer to 30 hours for working parents - worth up to £5,000 per child – with that increased entitlement successfully rolled out in several areas across the country. Alongside this, we are introducing tax free childcare which will save families up to £2,000 per child per year.’

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