Positive relationships

All aspects of the Positive Relationships theme of the EYFS, including child behaviour, attachment, the key person system, staff relationships, and working with parents. Regular features include Behaviour and Parent's Guides.

prfionamain

Positive Relationships: Bereavement - Fiona's story

‘Once upon a time there was a princess called Fiona…’ How one setting in Luton dealt with the death of an outstanding, much-loved practitioner. By Anni McTavish

Working With Parents

aabkdown4

EYFS Best Practice - All about… family breakdown

When parents split up, practitioners can be pivotal in helping children feel secure and understand the situation. Annette Rawstrone explains what staff can do to...

kitchen3

Nursery Food: Community - Goodie bags

In Glasgow, one nursery school is encouraging families to eat healthily by distributing ‘Easypack Meals’ – bags containing the ingredients for a tasty, nutritious...

prschemas1

Positive Relationships: Working With Parents - On message

It’s important to get parents to support their children’s schematic behaviour, explains Helen Petrie

prconstruction1

Home Learning - A parent’s guide to… construction play

This type of play should bring out the designer in both boys and girls, explains Penny Tassoni


Behaviour

aafriendscover

EYFS Best Practice - All about…children’s friendships

Being able to make friends is easier for some than it is for others, but practitioners can help all children to form relationships. Marion Dowling explains how

prbehaviouract1

Positive Relationships: Behaviour - In the acts

In an extract from her book on understanding children’s behaviour, Cath Hunter explains some of the underlying reasons behind difficult behaviour and how it can...

parentingprogs

Positive Relationships: Parenting Programmes - Something to prove

High-quality parenting programmes can support vulnerable people and their ability to parent. Charlotte Goddard profiles one such programme and the challenges facing...

teenagemenatlhealth

Troubled teens left in limbo

The ‘epidemic’ requires a mix of early intervention and later support services, finds Charlotte Goddard