Nursery group seeks chair for new parents' forum

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The Co-operative Childcare is looking for an independent chairperson with experience of early years.

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Mike Abbott: ‘Talking to parents and allowing them an open forum to have their say builds trust, and provides a valuable way of listening to ideas and concerns.'

The Parent Advisory Panel, made up of 12 parent volunteers whose children attend one of the 50 Co-operative Childcare nurseries across the country, will meet twice a year to discuss best practice and act as a consultative body.

Nominations for panel members to be chosen by the end of May should be made to the relevant childcare area manager.

Topics discussed will range from food available at the nurseries to wider issues such as how nurseries communicate with parents.

The nursery group is hoping to find an independent chair for the panel by this summer, who has experience of early years education and is able to use this insight to guide the meetings,

Mike Abbott, group general manager for Co-operative Childcare, said, ‘Childcare and the costs associated with quality care have remained high on the news agenda with the government recently committing to providing greater financial support to parents, making childcare a more viable option. Financial concerns aside there is no doubt that childcare is an emotive subject for parents who are putting their trust in a provider. 

 ‘Talking to parents and allowing them an open forum to have their say builds trust, and provides a valuable way of listening to ideas and concerns. From a wider perspective seeking the views of parents helps to ensure the needs of children and their families remains our number one priority and we consistently provide all children with high quality care and education that we are proud of in an environment that children really enjoy and thrive in.

 ‘Communication is what truly makes the Co-operative movement different, and opportunities like our Parent Advisory Panel ensure that parents and members really see the benefit of their choice.’